Bell Ringers

Check out this helpful video about commas!

Senior Grammar Packet

Looking for Journal Prompts?  Find today’s date on the class calendar and click on the journal you’re missing–the prompt will pop up.

9/18-20/2017–English I Review #3: Parts of Speech

This activity comes from Purdue OWL.

ADJECTIVE or ADVERB: Select the correct item from each pair.  Write only the correct words. Remember that adverbs answer questions about How, When, Where, or Why. Adjectives answer Which, What kind of, or How many?

Monday 9/18

1. He (correct, correctly) defined the terms. The answer sounded (correctly, correct).

2. She (quickly, quick) adjusted the fees. She adapted (quick, quickly) to any situation.

3. He measured the floor (exact, exactly). They proved to be (perfectly, perfect) (exact, exactly) measurements.

Tuesday 9/19

4. The stillness of the tomb was (awfully, awful). The tomb was (awfully, awful) still.

5. It was a (dangerously, dangerous) lake to swim in. The man was (dangerous, dangerously) drunk. The gas smelled (dangerously,dangerous).

6. She performed (magnificent, magnificently). It was a (magnificent, magnificently) beautiful performance.

Wednesday 9/20

7. Her voice sounds (beautifully, beautiful). She sang the song (exact, exactly) as it was written. We heard it (perfectly, perfect).

8. He was a very (sensibly, sensible) person. He acted very (sensible, sensibly).

9. Mike wrote too (slow, slowly) on the exam. He always writes (slow, slowly).

10. Talk (softly, soft) or don’t talk at all. The music played (softly, soft).

Journal #3

1. “Poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings: it takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquility.” ? William Wordsworth, Lyrical Ballads
2. Chaucer’s tales address a number of themes still important to many today: morals, faith, gender roles, human folly, etc. Which of these themes from the General Prologue, the Pardoner’s Tale, or the Wife of Bath’s Tale spoke to you? Which themes that you noticed seem to resonate today?
3. Check In

9/11-13/2017–English I Review #2: Parts of Speech

Bell Ringers for the week of 9/11/2017 are taken from the Holt McDougal British Literature textbook online.

DIRECTIONS: Underline the adverbs from the following sentences, and draw an arrow from each adverb to the word or words it modifies. **WRITE ONLY THE VERB & ADVERB, not the whole sentence.

EXAMPLE 1. Jamaal generously offered to take us in his boat to try our new water skis.
Write:  generously –>offered

#1-2 Monday 9/11
1. Cheryl and I quickly donned our life jackets and raced to Jamaal’s boat.
2. We really believed we could skim gracefully over the water after a few minutes on our skis.

#3-4 Tuesday 9/12
3. Soon we were roaring toward the ski area; there we dropped Cheryl overboard with the skis and towrope.
4. When Cheryl was ready, Jamaal accelerated gradually, and Cheryl rose smoothly above the surface.

#5 Wednesday 9/13
5. She swung easily to the right but then careened wildly to the left before plunging into the boat’s wake.

Journal 2

Write 1/2 page or about 150-200 words. Include a response to #1 or #2, then (optionally) do a check in. DO NOT COPY THE PROMPT–it does not count toward your length.

1. “I will eviscerate you in fiction. Every pimple, every character flaw. I was naked for a day; you will be naked for eternity.” (Spoken by the character “Geoffrey Chaucer” in A Knight’s Tale to the pardoner and summoner who cheated him and took his clothes.)

2. Chaucer is one of the most celebrated authors in the English language, and is known for writing especially engaging characters with detail that still resounds even in modern times. What authors do you know/like who have similar gifts–either writing particularly good characters, or perhaps creating great images or engaging worlds?

3. Check in.

9/5-6/2017–English I Review #1: Parts of Speech

from the Holt McDougal British Literature textbook online.

Directions: Copy down the following sentences, then underline the nouns and circle the adjectives.  You do not need to underline a, an, or the.

1-Tuesday 9/5

My little sister and brother are fascinated by the program Teletubbies, in which four technological babies frolic in an imaginary world.

2-Wednesday 9/6

The performers in Ipi Ntombi, a South African musical, wear splendid costumes as they perform a lively blend of traditional and modern South African song and dance.

Journal 1

**Note** Turn in a page with your M-W Bell Ringers on one side, and your journal on the other. We will do this each Thursday.

Choose one or more of the following prompts, and respond in a half-page journal entry. Prompt 1 will always be a quote, prompt 2 is a question, and prompt 3 is a Check In.

Write about either prompt 1 or 2, then you may also write a check-in. Minimum 1/2 page (~200 words) total.
1. “Chaucer’s pilgrims are the characters which compose all ages and nations…. Some of the names or titles are altered by time, but the characters themselves forever remain unaltered.” (William Blake) Have people changed since historical times, or is the change only superficial?
OR
“The greatest scholars are not usually the wisest people” (Geoffrey Chaucer, The Complete Poetry and Prose)
OR
2. For the Personal Marketing writing, you have had to write in very positive terms about your own experiences and achievements. How is this different from writing you have done in the past? What challenges have you found while writing this piece?
THEN
3. Check-in: How are you doing? What’s happening this week in your life? Do you have any questions, concerns, feelings, stories, or events to share?

———————————————————————

4/24-26/17–MLA Citations (in-text)
Monday: #1-2
Tuesday #3-4
Wednesday #5-6
4/18-19/17–More Blending/Embedding Quotations
Methods of embedding quotations:
1. Introduce the quotation with a complete sentence and a colon.
2. Use an introductory or explanatory phrase, but not a complete sentence, separated from the quotation with a comma.
3. Make the quotation a part of your own sentence without any punctuation between your own words and the words you are quoting.
4. Use short quotations–only a few words–as part of your own sentence.
Verbs for introducing quotations, summaries, or paraphrases
describes
explains
illustrates
notes
observes
points out
records
relates
reports
says
sees
thinks
writes
analyzes
asks
assesses
concludes
considers
finds
predicts
proposes
reveals
shows
suggests
supposes
claims
contends
defends
disagrees
holds
insists
maintains
admits
agrees
concedes
concurs
grants
belittles
bemoans
complains
condemns
deplores
deprecates
derides
laments
speculates
warns
Tuesday 4/18
1. Write a sentence in which you QUOTE George R.R. Martin. Use a verb and adverb that show you DISAGREE with his idea.
“There are no heroes…in life, the monsters win.”
George R.R. Martin
Wednesday 4/19
1. Write a sentence in which you QUOTE Teddy Roosevelt. Use a verb and an adverb to AGREE with his idea:  “It is hard to fail, but it is worse never to have tried to succeed.” Theodore Roosevelt
2. Write a sentence in which you PARAPHRASE Ayn Rand. Use a verb and an adverb to AGREE OR DISAGREE with her idea: “The hardest thing to explain is the glaringly evident which everybody has decided not to see.”  Ayn Rand, The Fountainhead
4/10-11/17–More Blending/Embedding Quotations
Monday 2 (of 4) ways of embedding quotations:
1. Introduce the quotation with a complete sentence and a colon.
Example: In “Where I Lived, and What I Lived For,” Thoreau states directly his purpose for going into the woods: “I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.”
Example: Thoreau’s philosophy might be summed up best by his repeated request for people to ignore the insignificant details of life: “Our life is frittered away by detail. An honest man has hardly need to count more than his ten fingers, or in extreme cases he may add his ten toes, and lump the rest. Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity!”
Example: Thoreau ends his essay with a metaphor: “Time is but the stream I go a-fishing in.”
This is an easy rule to remember: if you use a complete sentence to introduce a quotation, you need a colon after the sentence. Be careful not to confuse a colon (:) with a semicolon (;). Using a comma in this situation will most likely create a comma splice, one of the serious sentence-boundary errors.
2. Use an introductory or explanatory phrase, but not a complete sentence, separated from the quotation with a comma.
Example: In “Where I Lived, and What I Lived For,” Thoreau states directly his purpose for going into the woods when he says, “I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.”
Example: Thoreau suggests the consequences of making ourselves slaves to progress when he says, “We do not ride on the railroad; it rides upon us.”
Example: Thoreau asks, “Why should we live with such hurry and waste of life?”
Example: According to Thoreau, “We do not ride on the railroad; it rides upon us.”
You should use a comma to separate your own words from the quotation when your introductory or explanatory phrase ends with a verb such as “says,” “said,” “thinks,” “believes,” “pondered,” “recalls,” “questions,” and “asks” (and many more). You should also use a comma when you introduce a quotation with a phrase such as “According to Thoreau.”
Use the following quotations and write one sentence utilizing each of the methods above (2 sentences total):
1. “Wherever the poetry of myth is interpreted as biography, history, or science, it is killed.”
Joseph Campbell, The Hero With a Thousand Faces
2. “Heroes may not be braver than anyone else. They’re just braver 5 minutes longer.”
Ronald Reagan
Tuesday 2 more (of the 4) ways of blending quotations:
3. Make the quotation a part of your own sentence without any punctuation between your own words and the words you are quoting.
Example: In “Where I Lived, and What I Lived For,” Thoreau states directly his purpose for going into the woods when he says that “I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.”
Example: Thoreau suggests the consequences of making ourselves slaves to progress when he says that “We do not ride on the railroad; it rides upon us.”
Example: Thoreau argues that “shams and delusions are esteemed for soundest truths, while reality is fabulous.”
Example: According to Thoreau, people are too often “thrown off the track by every nutshell and mosquito’s wing that falls on the rails.”
Notice that the word “that” is used in three of the examples above, and when it is used as it is in the examples, “that” replaces the comma which would be necessary without “that” in the sentence. You usually have a choice, then, when you begin a sentence with a phrase such as “Thoreau says.” You either can add a comma after “says” (Thoreau says, “quotation”)  or you can add the word “that” with no comma (Thoreau says that “quotation.”)
4. Use short quotations–only a few words–as part of your own sentence.
Example: In “Where I Lived, and What I Lived For,” Thoreau states that his retreat to the woods around Walden Pond was motivated by his desire “to live deliberately” and to face only “the essential facts of life.”
Example: Thoreau argues that people blindly accept “shams and delusions” as the “soundest truths,” while regarding reality as “fabulous.”
Example: Although Thoreau “drink[s] at” the stream of Time, he can “detect how shallow it is.”
When you integrate quotations in this way, you do not use any special punctuation. Instead, you should punctuate the sentence just as you would if all of the words were your own. No punctuation is needed in the sentences above in part because the sentences do not follow the pattern explained under number 1 and 2 above: there is not a complete sentence in front of the quotations, and a word such as “says,” “said,” or “asks” does not appear directly in front of the quoted words.
All of the methods above for integrating quotations are correct, but you should avoid relying too much on just one method. You should instead use a variety of methods.
  1. “A man who has been through bitter experiences and travelled far enjoys even his sufferings after a time”
    HomerThe Odyssey
  2. “There’s never been a true war that wasn’t fought between two sets of people who were certain they were in the right. The really dangerous people believe they are doing whatever they are doing solely and only because it is without question the right thing to do. And that is what makes them dangerous.”
    Neil GaimanAmerican Gods
4/3-5/17–Blending/Embedding Quotations 
EXAMPLES:
Serious room for improvement:
William Golding’s book Lord of the Flies is about kids stranded on an island. Some of the kids are good and some are bad. “Roger, with a sense of delirious abandonment, leaned all his weight on the lever” (180). So I ask you, what causes irresponsible behavior? Ralph is good, but Jack is bad.
Room for improvement:
There are some bad children on the island. One of them is Roger. He drops a boulder on Piggy and kills him. “Roger, with a sense of delirious abandonment, leaned all his weight on the lever” (180). This caused Piggy’s death.
A possible revision:
The truest form of wickedness on the island is evident in Roger. He demonstrates his true depravity when, “with a sense of delirious abandonment, [he] leaned all his weight on the lever” (180). Well aware of Piggy’s place beneath him, Roger willingly takes Piggy’s life.
Another possible revision:
Roger’s murder of Piggy clearly illustrates the depths children can sink to without appropriate supervision. As he stood high above Piggy on the mountain, “Roger, with a sense of delirious abandonment, leaned all his weight on the lever” (180). His willingness to welcome the moment with “delirious abandonment” clearly demonstrates the level of pleasure that Roger received by committing this horrific act.
Read the following examples from student papers and identify whether the quote is embedded or not: write “E” for embedded and “NE” for not embedded. For each “NE,” rewrite the sentence(s) with corrections. Be sure to correct any punctuation errors, too! 
Monday:
  1. Stated in his piece, “…the fore or hind quarter will make a reasonable dish, and seasoned with a little pepper or salt will be very good boiled”. He says this to tell the reader or readers how to essentially prepare this delicious dish to shock the reader even more, by giving details that relates even closer to the human heart.
  2. The terms “make me bow,” “after-loss,” and “conquer’d woe” indicate that Shakespeare feels as if he is fighting a war in which both the world and the unidentified subject of his sonnet are partaking in a battle against him.
Tuesday:
  1. Gene pushes a limb of a tree just enough for Phineas to “tumbled sideways, broke through the little branches below and hit the bank with a sickening, unnatural thud” (60).
  2. She tells him “Vain man that dost in a vain assay”, meaning that he is full of himself and that writing her name in the sand is silly.
Wednesday:
  1. The passage concludes with a final “melancholy wail,” developing the setting as mysterious and sorrowful (21).
  2. At first, Sigurd is skeptical of the task, but accepts the quest when Regin challenges his bravery, “and if you were as brave as your father, you would not fear him.” (Lang)
Source:  http://msduryea.wikispaces.com/Embedding+Quotations
3/13-15/17–Formatting citations
Activities from Lord Fairfax Community College.
Click here for Monday (pg. 1) & Tuesday (pg. 2)
Click here for Wednesday (do #4, 5, & 6 only!)
3/6-8/17–Even More Parallel Structure
From GrammarBytes.com
Monday
1. A bathroom sink filled with hair, counter surfaces piled with paper and books, and __________________________________________________ dissuaded Beverly from sharing the apartment with Tina.
Fill in the blank using the information below. Maintain parallel structure.
In addition, Tina’s refrigerator had shelves stuffed with moldy leftovers.
2. To make his weight class for the wrestling match, Bart sipped a diet soda, nibbled carrot sticks, and __________________________________________________.
Fill in the blank using the information below. Maintain parallel structure.
Refusing Sam’s offer of a slice of pizza was another strategy Bart used to lose weight.
3. The presence of a vampire, a space alien, or ________________________________ __________________ will make Noreen reject a movie.
Fill in the blank using the information below. Maintain parallel structure.
Noreen also refuses to watch any film that includes a zombie serial killer who is wielding a knife or a chainsaw.
Tuesday
4. If we manage to pass our calculus class, we will celebrate by shouting, high-fiving, and __________________________________________________.
Fill in the blank using the information below. Maintain parallel structure.
Moreover, we might dump a bucket of Gatorade over Professor Nguyen’s head.
5. At the library, Francis hoped to complete his math homework, research Da Vinci for his Renaissance art class, and __________________________________________________.
Fill in the blank using the information below. Maintain parallel structure.
Carving “Francis loves Dawn” in the wood table was another goal for the afternoon.
6. Mara always refuses Andre’s offer to style her hair because she fears a bald head, an odd color, and __________________________________________________.
Fill in the blank using the information below. Maintain parallel structure.
Mara also worries that Andre will make the ends of her hair frizzy.
Wednesday
7. Tardiness, absences, and __________________________________________________ are the behaviors that have gotten Brendan in trouble with his boss, Mr. Powell.
Fill in the blank using the information below. Maintain parallel structure.
In addition, Mr. Powell is annoyed when Brendan shows disrespect to the customers and fellow employees.
8. This semester, Sam hopes to pass Microbiology, not faint in his speech class, and __________________________________________________.
Fill in the blank using the information below. Maintain parallel structure.
Convincing Gloria to go out with him is another goal that Sam hopes to meet.
9. Because Frank allowed Grumpy the bulldog in the apartment, Sandy kept her pet off the furniture, bathed him regularly, and __________________________________________________.
Fill in the blank using the information below. Maintain parallel structure.
In addition, Sandy didn’t mind vacuuming every day.
2/27-3/1/17–More Parallel Structure
Monday
Look up the following vocab terms and write down the definitions in your notebook. Use encyclopedia definitions where possible, as dictionary definitions may be inadequate.  Please keep this on a separate page from your other bell ringers, as you will want to keep it in your notebook for reference.
  • Eschatology
  • Revelation
  • Deluge
  • Apocalypse
  • Armageddon
Tuesday
From www.mhhe.com/: For each “non-parallel” sentence, replace the underlined portion with the choice that creates a parallel structure. Write the letter AND THE CORRESPONDING ANSWER.
  1. Learning a new language as an adult is more difficult than to learn one as a child.
    1. Learning
    2. to learning
    3. no change
  2. Every morning, I run two miles, walk one mile, and half a mile on the bike.
    1. half a mile.
    2. bike half a mile.
    3. no change
  3. There are two ways to get a promotion: working hard or make friends in high places.
    1. work hard
    2. to working hard
    3. no change
  4. Many college students have the same goals: playing hard, doing well in classes, and a job after graduation.
    1. after graduation, a job.
    2. finding a job after graduation.
    3. no change
  5. The man walked down the street, stopped at a shop window, and was fixing his tie.
    1. fixed his tie.
    2. to fix his tie.
    3. no change
Wednesday
From www.mhhe.com/: For each “non-parallel” sentence, replace the underlined portion with the choice that creates a parallel structure. Write the letter AND THE CORRESPONDING ANSWER.
  1. The chef chopped the parsley, peeled the tomatoes and cut the zucchini into cubes.
    1. was cutting the zucchini into cubes
    2. cubed the zucchini
    3. no change
  2. People often try to avoid eye contact with others, whether riding on a bus, strolling through a shopping mall, or when they are in line at a supermarket.
    1. waiting in line at a supermarket
    2. in a supermarket line
    3. no change
  3. When trying to impress a prospective employer, people should pay attention to their clothing, their posture, and that they don’t use too much slang.
    1. if they use too much slang
    2. their speech
    3. no change
  4. Critics argue that the television show trivializes violence, glamorizes drug use and premarital sex.
    1. encourages premarital sex
    2. was encouraging premarital sex
    3. no change
  5. The bedroom was filled with old newspapers and radios that don’t work.
    1. radios that are broken
    2. broken radios
    3. no change
2/21-22/17–Parallel Structure
FromOWL: Parallel structure means using the same pattern of words to show that two or more ideas have the same level of importance. This can happen at the word, phrase, or clause level. For example:
Not Parallel:
Mary likes hiking, swimming, and to ride a bicycle.
Parallel:
Mary likes hiking, swimming, and riding a bicycle.
(See OWL’s page on parallel structure for more examples.)
Monday-No School
Tuesday
From www.ode.state.or.us/ : Revise these awkward sentences to create parallel structure.
  1. The report was well-researched, concise, and it was also of great relevance to today’s world.
  2. The researchers conducted studies, drew conclusions, conducted a peer review, and then a report of the results was written for the public.
  3. The legislative committee decided to review the research and also decided on inviting testimony from experts.
Wednesday
  1. Informing himself about the issue seemed just as important as to vote on it.
  2. Now that the issues are on the table, the best approach is not to antagonize the opposition but getting everyone to considering all the evidence.
  3. When my classmate read the draft of my essay, she thought my supporting evidence was strong, but she also thought that my weakness was my introduction.
2/13-15/17–Sentence Style: Wordiness
From Purdue OWL:
Revise these sentences to state their meaning in fewer words. Avoid passive voice, needless repetition, and wordy phrases and clauses. The first sentence has been done as an example.
Monday 1-4
1. Many local farmers plan to attend next Friday’s meeting.
2. Although Bradley Hall is regularly populated by students, close study of the building as a structure is seldom undertaken by them.
3. He dropped out of school on account of the fact that it was necessary for him to help support his family.
4. It is expected that the new schedule will be announced by the bus company within the next few days.
Tuesday: Dashes (http://www.dailygrammar.com)
Dashes are used to give emphasis to written ideas and are typed by using two hyphens. They should be used sparingly.
Use a dash to show a break in thought or sentence structure. Example: He had tried to change–you’re not even paying attention!
Instructions: Use dashes where they are needed in the following sentences. You must write the word BEFORE the dash, the dash, and the word AFTER the dash.
  1. We will invite Susan she is the new girl next door to our party.
  2. The dog slid on the vinyl his nails acting like skates and crashed into the trash can.
  3. When our stockpile was sold indeed, dumped for surplus all our sales were compromised.
  4. Today has been but I will not bore you with my troubles.
  5. Let me tell you about watch where you are going!
Wednesday: Parenthesis (http://www.write.com)
For each of the following exercises, add parentheses to enclose supplemental information, acronyms and dates or letters and/or numbers in a series. Add or remove any punctuation as needed to use the parentheses correctly. Please write ONLY the words/numbers in the parentheses.
  1. The lease stipulates that the monthly rent $750 is due by the fifth of each month.
  2. We need a customer service representative who can 1 treat clients with respect, 2 handle complaints and 3 think quickly.
  3. Samuel is an active member of the National Rifle Association NRA.
  4. Muhammad Ali born Cassius Marcellus Clay, Jr. was born on January 17, 1942.
12/5/16-1/13/17–Activities from Purdue OWL
The following activities were covered in the second half of Quarter 2 with Ms. Gerken:
sentence structure
subject-verb agreement
writing numbers
11/28-30/2016–English I Review #11: Sentence Errors
Activities taken from Purdue OWL
Monday 11/28:  Sentence Fragments
The sentences below appeared in papers written by students. Act as their editor, marking a C if the sentences in the group are all complete and an F if any of the sentences in the group is a fragment. Could you tell these writers why the fragments are incomplete sentences?
____ 1. Then I attended Morris Junior High. A junior high that was a bad experience.
____ 2. The scene was filled with beauty. Such as the sun sending its brilliant rays to the earth and the leaves of various shades of red, yellow, and brown moving slowly in the wind.
____ 3. He talked for fifty minutes without taking his eyes off his notes. Like other teachers in that department, he did not encourage students’ questions.
____ 4. Within each group, a wide range of features to choose from. It was difficult to distinguish between them.
____ 5. A few of the less serious fellows would go into a bar for a steak dinner and a few glasses of beer. After this meal, they were ready for anything.
Tuesday 11/29: Run-ons, comma splices, and fused sentences
1. He enjoys walking through the country. He often goes backpacking on his vacations. (Use a comma and a coordinate conjunction to combine these two sentences)
2. He often watched TV when there were only reruns. She preferred to read instead.
(Use a semicolon and a conjunctive adverb–however, meanwhile, nevertheless, moreover, etc.–to combine these two sentences)
3. They weren’t dangerous criminals they were detectives in disguise.  (Correct the fused sentence using accurate punctuation and conjunctions)
4. I didn’t know which job I wanted I was too confused to decide.  (Correct the fused sentence using accurate punctuation and conjunctions)
Wednesday 11/30
Choose the correct form of the verb that agrees with the subject.
1. Either my mother or my father (is, are) coming to the meeting.
2. George and Tamara (doesn’t, don’t) want to see that movie.
3. Benito (doesn’t, don’t) know the answer.
4. One of my sisters (is, are) going on a trip to France.
5. Mathematics (is, are) John’s favorite subject, while Civics (is, are) Andrea’s favorite subject.
 
 
11/14-16/2016–English I Review #10: More Colons and Semicolons
NOTE: This week’s activities will be turned in with the activity from Monday 11/7 due to the fire last week which prevented us from finishing Bell Ringer activities.
Monday 11/14 
Semicolons:
–Join two independent clauses that are closely related
–Separate items in a list when those items are long/complicated (especially if they include commas)
Colons:
–After an independent clause that precedes a list
–After an independent clause to link to another clause (dep. or ind.) that logically follows from the first clause.
Directions:  Add correct punctuation, including semicolons or colons, to each of the following:
  1. The use of these punctuation marks often confuses students comma semicolon colon hyphen and dash
  2. Music is more than a mechanical arrangement of sounds it is an expression of deep feeling and ethical values
  3. When dinosaurs agree on something they’ll often high five one another dinosaurs are all about high fives
Sources:
http://leo.stcloudstate.edu/punct/col-semi.html
http://theoatmeal.com/comics/semicolon
 
Tuesday 11/15
Activity from OWL:
Each of the following sentences needs either a comma or a semicolon. Put in the necessary punctuation.
  1. Many companies make sugar-free soft drinks, which are flavored by synthetic chemicals the drinks usually contain only one or two calories per serving.
  2. Leyland played the viola professionally for many years and he now conducts a community orchestra.
  3. The crab grass was flourishing but the rest of the lawn, unfortunately, was dying.
Source: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/engagement/2/1/44/
Wednesday 11/16
Choose the correctly punctuated sentence  (A, B, or C) from each of the following selections:
  1. a) Steve always went to watch football: he loved the atmosphere at the games.
    b) Steve always went to watch football, he loved the atmosphere at the games.
    c) Steve always went to watch football; he loved the atmosphere at the games.
  2. a) I love eating; eggs, bacon, cheese and toast.
    b) I love eating eggs bacon cheese and toast.
    c) I love eating eggs, bacon, cheese and toast.
  3. a) These are my favorite countries; Spain Hungary India and Greece.
    b) These are my favorite countries: Spain, Hungary, India and Greece.
    c) These are my favorite countries: Spain Hungary India and Greece.
  4. a) As the sun was rising. Steve was getting into bed.
    b) As the sun was rising, Steve was getting into bed.
    c) As the sun was rising; Steve was getting into bed.
  5. a) I love writing; English was always my favorite subject.
    b) I love writing English; was always my favorite subject.
    c) I love writing, English was always my favorite subject.
Source: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/arts/exercises/grammar/grammar_tutorial/page_48.htm#sepclauses
11/7-9/2016–English I Review #10: More Colons and Semicolons
Monday 11/7
From GrammarGirl.com:
–Colon is to introduce or define something.
For example, you could write, “Squiggly checked the temperature: it was -20 degrees.”
I would use a colon in that sentence instead of a semicolon because the second clause (the temperature) strongly relates back to the first clause (Squiggly checking the temperature).
–When you are joining things, you use a semicolon to join things of equal weight, whereas you can use a colon to join things of equal or unequal weight.
For example, you can use either a semicolon or a colon to join two [independent] clauses, but you can only use a colon to join a[n independent] clause with a noun.
Ex: “Squiggly missed only one friend: Aardvark.”
You couldn’t use a semicolon in that sentence because the two parts are unequal.
Directions: Add correct punctuation, including semicolons or colons, to each of the following:
  1. All the children behaved very well therefore they will all get a treat
  2. The speakers were Dr. Judith Cornwell English Dr. Peter Mortrude biology Dr. Shirley Enders history and Dr. Charles Viceroy mathematics
  3. After a sleepless night the senator made her decision she would not seek re election

    Sources:
    http://quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/semicolons
    http://leo.stcloudstate.edu/punct/col-semi.html
Tuesday 11/8
Semicolons:
–Join two independent clauses that are closely related
–Separate items in a list when those items are long/complicated (especially if they include commas)
Colons:
–After an independent clause that precedes a list
–After an independent clause to link to another clause (dep. or ind.) that logically follows from the first clause.
Directions:  Add correct punctuation, including semicolons or colons, to each of the following:
  1. The use of these punctuation marks often confuses students comma semicolon colon hyphen and dash
  2. Music is more than a mechanical arrangement of sounds it is an expression of deep feeling and ethical values
  3. When dinosaurs agree on something they’ll often high five one another dinosaurs are all about high fives
Sources:
http://leo.stcloudstate.edu/punct/col-semi.html
http://theoatmeal.com/comics/semicolon
 
Wednesday 11/9
Activity from OWL:

Each of the following sentences needs either a comma or a semicolon. Put in the necessary punctuation.
  1. Many companies make sugar-free soft drinks, which are flavored by synthetic chemicals the drinks usually contain only one or two calories per serving.
  2. Leyland played the viola professionally for many years and he now conducts a community orchestra.
  3. The crab grass was flourishing but the rest of the lawn, unfortunately, was dying.
Source: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/engagement/2/1/44/
10/31-11/3/2016–English I Review #9: Colons & Semicolons
Monday 10/31
From OWL: You can use a semi-colon to join two independent clauses. Joining two independent clauses this way implies that the two clauses are related and/or equal, or perhaps that one restates the other.
Ex: I am going to visit Anna in St. Louis next weekend; we’ll get to see the Arch, Busch Stadium, and the Landing.
You can also use semi-colons between items in a list that already involve commas.
Ex: The sweaters I bought today were purple, blue, and green; yellow, white, and red; and pink, black, and grey.
DIRECTIONS: Add correct punctuation, including semicolons, to each of the following:
  1. One could always change the channel while Ya Ya was watching TV there was no need to even ask (Sedaris)
  2. The peach was once a bitter almond cauliflower is nothing but cabbage with a college education (Twain)
  3. At Halloween we gave out Reese’s Snickers and Crunch bars gumballs caramels and taffy and apples and candy corn
 
Tuesday 11/1:
DIRECTIONS: Review rules for semicolons in your English IV Grammar packet, then add correct punctuation, including semicolons, to each of the following
  1. I bought shiny ripe apples small sweet juicy grapes and firm pears
  2. The air was full of the scent of growing things strange shy creatures came and went about him as he walked (Wodehouse)
  3. I have lived in Chicago Illinois Kansas City Missouri and Omaha Nebraska
 
Wednesday 11/2:  From OWL:
Use a colon after an independent clause when introducing a list.
Ex: The catering facility offers the following entrees: fried catfish, grilled chicken, pan-seared salmon, and sirloin steak.
Use a colon after an independent clause when introducing a quotation.
Ex: My teacher’s remark on my final essay was very complimentary: “This essay coherently analyzes musical trends of the late 20th century.”
Use a colon between two independent clauses when you want to emphasize the second clause.
Ex: I don’t understand why everyone shops at that store: everything there is so expensive.
 
DIRECTIONS: Add correct punctuation, including colons, to each of the following
  1. There are three countries on the island of Great Britain Scotland England and Wales
  2. In this world there are only two tragedies one is not getting what one wants and the other is getting it (Wilde)
  3. Joe has only one thing on his mind world domination
10/24-26/2016–English I Review #8: Commas 
This week’s activities are taken from Purdue OWL.
Monday 10/24/16
DIRECTIONS: Review the rules for comma usage in your English IV Grammar Packet (pg. 6-7), then insert commas into the sentences below as needed:
1. There was no question that John’s painting a huge colorful and ugly mural was the worst entry in the art exhibit.
2. Werner von Braun Willy Ley and Edward Teller noted authorities in the field of rocket development have done much to guide the missile program of the United States.
3. Mr. Cready’s ability to say the wrong thing at the wrong time is I believe amazing.
Tuesday 10/25/16
DIRECTIONS: Review the rules for comma usage in your English IV Grammar Packet (pg. 6-7), then insert commas into the sentences below as needed:
4. Running around the house the dog was abruptly stopped by a fence.
5. If the opposition should win our candidate would never have any political future.
6. Gracefully lightly and daintily the ballerina moved across the stage.
Wednesday 10/26/16
DIRECTIONS: Review the rules for comma usage in your English IV Grammar Packet (pg. 6-7), then insert commas into the sentences below as needed:
7. Glamour the woman’s fashion magazine recently incorporated with Charm another fashion journal.
8. Joe was born on May 7 1955 and his best friend was born exactly two months later on July 7 1955.
9. Mr. and Mrs. Kwon my parents’ best friends sat in front of us at the football game.
10/17-19/2016–English I Review #7: Independent & Dependent Clauses
Clauses and phrases from http://www.csus.edu/owl (California State University- Sacramento Online Writing Lab)
Monday 10/17
Identify each item as one of the following: Independent Clause (I), Dependent Clause (D), or Phrase (P). (Be careful to differentiate your Ps from your Ds)!
  1. Dorothy and the Scarecrow danced
  2.   if Toto could talk
  3. witches in dark suits wear ruby slippers
  4. since one size fits all girls from Kansas
  5. L. Frank Baum wrote the story for his daughter
  6. an ineffective president portrayed as a wizard
  7. lions and tigers and bears
Tuesday 10/18
Identify each item as one of the following: Independent Clause (I), Dependent Clause (D), or Phrase (P). (Be careful to differentiate your Ps from your Ds)!
  1. while characters represented different groups in American society
  2. the tin man as industrial workers
  3. Oz is short for ounce and referred to the gold standard
  4. although the city was emerald
  5. a gold bullion highway to prosperity and dreams
  6. was William Jennings Bryan a cowardly lion
  7. whereas small farmers were oppressed by Eastern bankers
Wednesday 10/19
Identify each item as one of the following: Independent Clause (I), Dependent Clause (D), or Phrase (P). (Be careful to differentiate your Ps from your Ds)!
  1. mounting resistance by the Grange
  2. purity and innocence characterize Dorothy
  3. blowing smoke and making noise in the great hall
  4. the great and powerful Oz was neither
  5. but Dorothy and Toto got home safely
  6. because Baum’s allegorical story became an American classic
10/10-12/2016–English I Review #6: Independent & Dependent Clauses
Monday 10/10
*Clauses are complete ideas; they have both a Subject (noun) and a verb.
*Phrases are incomplete ideas because they are missing a noun and/or a verb.
Identify each of the following as either a Clause ( C ), or a Phrase (P).
1.In the kitchen
2.I walked downtown
3.When I walked to the bedroom
4.Without the necessary equipment
5.Fighting against the enemy
6.The dog groaned at the food
7.Whenever I talk to my parents
Tuesday 10/11
Identify each item as one of the following:
Dependent Clause (D)   -Have a subject and a verb, but cannot stand alone as sentences because the thought is not complete.
Independent Clause (I)  -Have a subject and a verb and can stand alone as simple sentences.
Phrase (P)  -Missing either the subject or the verb
1.While I was standing in the kitchen
2.Without a clue in the world
3.I ran across the field
4.In the barn
5.Whenever I feel depressed
Wednesday 10/12
Identify each item as one of the following:
Dependent Clause (D)  -Have a subject and a verb, but cannot stand alone as sentences because the thought is not complete.
Independent Clause (I)  -Have a subject and a verb and can stand alone as simple sentences.
Phrase (P)  -Missing either the subject or the verb
1.The man with the funny hat
2.She stood in the bleachers
3.The airspeed velocity of an unladen swallow
4.I walked downtown
5.Since I won
10/3-5/2016–English I Review #5: Parts of Speech
Bell Ringers for the week of Oct. 3 2015-Oct. 5 2016 will be taken from the Holt McDougal British Literature textbook online.
Write prepositional phrases to fit the following sentences in order to provide details that make the sentences more interesting. Circle the prepositions you use.
“In English grammar, a preposition is a word… that shows the relationship between a noun or pronoun and other words in a sentence….
The combination of a preposition and a noun phrase is called a prepositional phrase….
Prepositions commonly convey the following relationships: agency (by); comparison (like, as . . . as); direction (to, toward, through); place (at, by, on); possession (of); purpose (for); source (from, out of); and time (at, before, on).” (grammar.about.com)
EXAMPLE 1. Please listen carefully   for  the doorbell.
#1-2: Monday 10/3/16
1. Marta makes delicious casseroles _____________________.
2. ___________________ he whistled a tune.
#3-4: Tuesday 10/4/16
3. Tourists _____________________________ enjoyed the traditional music.
4. _____________ the performance will begin.
#5: Wednesday 10/5/16
5. Excited _________________ the children eagerly watched ________________.
Activity from online textbook at my.hrw.com
9/26-28/2016–English I Review #4: Parts of Speech
Bell Ringers for the week of 9/26/2016 will be taken from the Holt McDougal British Literature textbook online.
DIRECTIONS: Write the interjection from each of the following sentences.
EXAMPLE 1. Hey, whose backpack is this?
#1-2 Monday 9/26
1. Whew! It certainly is hot today!
2. She scored another goal! Hooray!
NO BELLRINGER Tuesday 9/27: DIES Assessment
#3-5 Wednesday 9/28
3. I love the way this cereal tastes! Yum!
4. Well, do we agree or disagree?
5. I’ve been training for the marathon, and, oh, the long distances are grueling!
9/19-21/2016–English I Review #3: Parts of Speech
Bell Ringers for the week of 9/19/2016 will be taken from the Holt McDougal British Literature textbook online.
Identify the part of speech of each italicized & underlined word by writing above the word one of the following abbreviations: V for verb, ADV for adverb, or CONJ for conjunction.  **WRITE ONLY THE WORD AND THE ABBREVIATION.**
EXAMPLE: Earlier I had seen the principal and explained our problem.
You write:   Earlier-ADV   had-V seen-V  and– CONJ 
#1- MON. 9/19
  1. With dagger in hand, Macbeth surreptitiously entered the room where King Duncan lay asleep and murdered him.
#2-3 TUES 9/20
  1. Winona carefully studied her notes again before she took the test on Geoffrey Chaucer.
  2. Sir Gawain, who was one of King Arthur’s bravest knights, boldly stepped forward and fearlessly accepted the challenge.
#4-5 WED 9/21
4. For twenty years Penelope and Telemachus, who were Odysseus’ wife and son, had anxiously waited for Odysseus to return to Ithaca.
5. We can read the original story about the hero Beowulf, or we can just as easily read John Gardner’s version, which is told from the point of view of the monster Grendel.
9/12-14/2016–English I Review #2: Parts of Speech
Bell Ringers for the week of 9/12/2016 are taken from the Holt McDougal British Literature textbook online.
DIRECTIONS: Underline the adverbs from the following sentences, and draw an arrow from each adverb to the word or words it modifies. **WRITE ONLY THE VERB & ADVERB, not the whole sentence.
EXAMPLE 1. Jamaal generously offered to take us in his boat to try our new water skis.
Write:  generously –>offered
#1-2 Monday 9/12
1. Cheryl and I quickly donned our life jackets and raced to Jamaal’s boat.
2. We really believed we could skim gracefully over the water after a few minutes on our skis.
#3-4 Tuesday 9/13
3. Soon we were roaring toward the ski area; there we dropped Cheryl overboard with the skis and towrope.
4. When Cheryl was ready, Jamaal accelerated gradually, and Cheryl rose smoothly above the surface.
#5 Wednesday 9/14
5. She swung easily to the right but then careened wildly to the left before plunging into the boat’s wake.
9/6-7/2016–English I Review #1: Parts of Speech
from the Holt McDougal British Literature textbook online.
Directions: Copy down the following sentences, then underline the nouns once and the adjectives twice.  You do not need to underline a, an, or the.
1-Tuesday 9/6
My little sister and brother are fascinated by the program Teletubbies, in which four technological babies frolic in an imaginary world.
2-Wednesday 9/7
The performers in Ipi Ntombi, a South African musical, wear splendid costumes as they perform a lively blend of traditional and modern South African song and dance.
——
May 23-25 2016–Last Bell Ringers of the Year!
Wordiness Activity from Purdue OWL:  Revise these sentences to state their meaning in fewer words. Avoid passive voice, needless repetition, and wordy phrases and clauses.
EX:  1. Many local farmers plan to attend next Friday’s meeting.
Monday 5/23
2. Although Bradley Hall is regularly populated by students, close study of the building as a structure is seldom undertaken by them.
3. He dropped out of school on account of the fact that it was necessary for him to help support his family.
4. It is expected that the new schedule will be announced by the bus company within the next few days.
Tuesday 5/24
5. There are many ways in which a student who is interested in meeting foreign students may come to know one.
6. It is very unusual to find someone who has never told a deliberate lie on purpose.
7. Trouble is caused when people disobey rules that have been established for the safety of all.
Wednesday 5/25
8. A campus rally was attended by more than a thousand students. Five students were arrested by campus police for disorderly conduct, while several others are charged by campus administrators with organizing a public meeting without being issued a permit to do so.
9. The subjects that are considered most important by students are those that have been shown to be useful to them after graduation.
10. In the not too distant future, college freshmen must all become aware of the fact that there is a need for them to make contact with an academic adviser concerning the matter of a major.
Monday 5/9 In this activity from Purdue OWL, the sentences need semicolons, colons, or commas. Add corrections as needed.
1. I finished reading The Nation and then I went to bed.
2. We always go to the mountains in the fall they are at their prettiest at that time of year.
3. Tim went to the candy store quite often the clerk even knew his name.
Tuesday 5/10
From D’Youville College OWL
  1. When I saw Mr. Walker my old English teacher I immediately thought of grammar.
    a.) When I saw, Mr. Walker my old English teacher, I immediately thought of grammar.
    b.) When I saw Mr. Walker, my old English teacher, I immediately thought of grammar.
    c.) When I saw, Mr. Walker my old English teacher I immediately thought, of grammar.
  2. One of my dogs Peppy has been sick for a long time.
    a.) One of my dogs, Peppy, has been sick for a long time.
    b.) One of my dogs, Peppy has been sick, for a long time.
    c.) One of my dogs, Peppy has been sick for a long time.
  3. Jane watched a movie Sophie`s Choice last week.
    a.) Jane watched a movie, Sophie`s Choice, last week.
    b.) Jane, watched a movie, Sophie`s Choice last week.
    c.) Jane watched a movie Sophie`s Choice, last week.
April 25-27  Noun phrases and appositives
Monday 4/25 – From Grammar Bytes!
[Appositives are always noun phrases.] A noun phrase includes a noun—a person, place, or thing—and the modifiers—either before or after—which distinguish it. The pattern looks like this:
Optional Modifier(s) + Noun +Optional Modifier(s)
EX: The shoplifted pair of jeans= noun phrase
Pair = noun; theshopliftedof jeans= modifiers.
EX: A cat that refused to meow= noun phrase
Cat = noun; athat refused to meow= modifiers.
EX: A great English teacher= noun phrase
Teacher = noun; agreatEnglish = modifiers.
DIRECTIONS: Rewrite the following sentences, adding appositive phrases that use the specified connective words. Punctuate the appositive phrases used and underline them. (Note: You can add appositives after any noun in the sentence.)
Example: The girls went to the park. (Begin your appositive with a negation.)
Answers: The girls, not the boys, went to the park. or The girls went to the park, not the museum.
  1. Tom turned the car to the left. (Begin your appositive with a negation.)
  2. The smugglers took the contaminated fish to market. (Begin your appositive with the word “fish.”)
  3. The pilot ate his dessert while he was piloting the plane. (Begin your appositive with the pronoun “something.”)
Activity from PanoramaHS
Tuesday 4/26 (from grammarwritingrevision.wordpress.com)
From OWL: “In some cases, the noun being explained is too general without the appositive; the information is essential to the meaning of the sentence. When this is the case, do not place commas around the appositive; just leave it alone. If the sentence would be clear and complete without the appositive, then commas are necessary; place one before and one after the appositive.”
DIRECTIONS:  Underline and punctuate the appositives in the following sentences. Remember: not all require punctuation.
  1. An above-average student and talented musician John made his family proud.
  2. The extremely popular American film Titanic was widely criticized for its mediocre script.
  3. Citizen Kane the greatest American film won only one Academy Award.
Wednesday 4/27  (from grammarwritingrevision.wordpress.com)
DIRECTIONS:  Underline and punctuate the appositives in the following sentences. Remember: not all require punctuation.
  1. 60 Minutes the TV news magazine program featured a story on the popular singer Whitney Houston.
  2. The poem one of Robert Frost’s best is called “The Death of the Hired Man.”
  3. I can’t find my notebook the one I use for history class.
Monday 4/11:
Activity from OWL:  Correct all punctuation: Put in semicolons, colons, dashes, quotation marks, Italics (use an underline), and parentheses where ever they are needed in the following sentences.
NOTE: “…parentheses. You use them to surround something that seems a bit out of place in the sentence—an aside, a clarification, or a commentary.”
“You can use dashes the same way we just talked about using parentheses, to enclose fragments or whole sentences, but you’d better be sure your words are worthy of dashes. Dashes interrupt your sentence in a way that parentheses or commas don’t.”
  1. The men in question Harold Keene, Jim Peterson, and Gerald Greene deserve awards.
  2. Several countries participated in the airlift Italy, Belgium, France, and Luxembourg.
  3. Only one course was open to us surrender, said the ex-major, and we did.
Tuesday 4/12
Activity from OWL:  Correct all punctuation: Put in semicolons, colons, dashes, quotation marks, Italics (use an underline), and parentheses where ever they are needed in the following sentences.
  1. There was a very interesting article entitled The New Rage for Folk Singing in last Sunday’s New York Times newspaper.
  2. Montaigne wrote the following A wise man never loses anything, if he has himself.
  3. Ron and Mike were both in English class this morning they gave an interesting presentation on their research.
Wednesday 4/13
Activity from OWL: Add punctuation to the following sentences, including underlining titles that you would italicize.
  1. Mary is trying hard in school this semester her father said
  2. No the taxi driver said curtly I cannot get you to the airport in fifteen minutes
  3. I believe Jack remarked that the best time of year to visit Europe is in the spring At least that’s what I read in a book entitled Guide to Europe
More Colons and Semicolons
Monday 4/4
From GrammarGirl.com:
–Colon is to introduce or define something.
For example, you could write, “Squiggly checked the temperature: it was -20 degrees.”
I would use a colon in that sentence instead of a semicolon because the second clause (the temperature) strongly relates back to the first clause (Squiggly checking the temperature).
–When you are joining things, you use a semicolon to join things of equal weight, whereas you can use a colon to join things of equal or unequal weight.
For example, you can use either a semicolon or a colon to join two [independent] clauses, but you can only use a colon to join a[n independent] clause with a noun.
Ex: “Squiggly missed only one friend: Aardvark.”
You couldn’t use a semicolon in that sentence because the two parts are unequal.
Directions: Add correct punctuation, including semicolons or colons, to each of the following:
  1. All the children behaved very well therefore they will all get a treat
  2. The speakers were Dr. Judith Cornwell English Dr. Peter Mortrude biology Dr. Shirley Enders history and Dr. Charles Viceroy mathematics
  3. After a sleepless night the senator made her decision she would not seek re election

    Sources:
    http://quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/semicolons
    http://leo.stcloudstate.edu/punct/col-semi.html
Tuesday 4/5
Semicolons:
–Join two independent clauses that are closely related
–Separate items in a list when those items are long/complicated (especially if they include commas)
Colons:
–After an independent clause that precedes a list
–After an independent clause to link to another clause (dep. or ind.) that logically follows from the first clause.
Directions:  Add correct punctuation, including semicolons or colons, to each of the following:
  1. The use of these punctuation marks often confuses students comma semicolon colon hyphen and dash
  2. Music is more than a mechanical arrangement of sounds it is an expression of deep feeling and ethical values
  3. When dinosaurs agree on something they’ll often high five one another dinosaurs are all about high fives
Sources:
http://leo.stcloudstate.edu/punct/col-semi.html
http://theoatmeal.com/comics/semicolon
 
Wednesday 4/6
Activity from OWL:
Each of the following sentences needs either a comma or a semicolon. Put in the necessary punctuation.
  1. Many companies make sugar-free soft drinks, which are flavored by synthetic chemicals the drinks usually contain only one or two calories per serving.
  2. Leyland played the viola professionally for many years and he now conducts a community orchestra.
  3. The crab grass was flourishing but the rest of the lawn, unfortunately, was dying.
Source: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/engagement/2/1/44/
Colons & Semicolons
Monday 3/21
From OWL: You can use a semi-colon to join two independent clauses. Joining two independent clauses this way implies that the two clauses are related and/or equal, or perhaps that one restates the other.
Ex: I am going to visit Anna in St. Louis next weekend; we’ll get to see the Arch, Busch Stadium, and the Landing.
You can also use semi-colons between items in a list that already involve commas.
Ex: I have lived in Chicago, Illinois; Kansas City, Missouri; and Omaha, Nebraska.
The sweaters I bought today were purple, blue, and green; yellow, white, and red; and pink, black, and grey.
DIRECTIONS: Add correct punctuation, including semicolons, to each of the following:
  1. One could always change the channel while Ya Ya was watching TV there was no need to even ask (Sedaris)
  2. The peach was once a bitter almond cauliflower is nothing but cabbage with a college education (Twain)
  3. The players were my heroes therefore my dad was my hero because he was the coach
 
Tuesday 3/22:
DIRECTIONS: Add correct punctuation, including semicolons, to each of the following
  1. I bought shiny ripe apples small sweet juicy grapes and firm pears
  2. The air was full of the scent of growing things strange shy creatures came and went about him as he walked (Wodehouse)
  3. I have lived in Chicago Illinois Kansas City Missouri and Omaha Nebraska
 
Wednesday 3/23:  From OWL:
Use a colon after an independent clause when introducing a list.
Ex: The catering facility offers the following entrees: fried catfish, grilled chicken, pan-seared salmon, and sirloin steak.
Use a colon after an independent clause when introducing a quotation.
Ex: My teacher’s remark on my final essay was very complimentary: “This essay coherently analyzes musical trends of the late 20th century.”
Use a colon between two independent clauses when you want to emphasize the second clause.
Ex: I don’t understand why everyone shops at that store: everything there is so expensive.
 
DIRECTIONS: Add correct punctuation, including colons, to each of the following
  1. There are three countries on the island of Great Britain Scotland England and Wales
  2. In this world there are only two tragedies one is not getting what one wants and the other is getting it (Wilde)
  3. Joe has only one thing on his mind world domination
MLA Formatting
Monday 3/14: No Bell Ringers. Happy tea and Pi Day!!
Tuesday 3/15:  Beware the Ides of March! 
MLA format is a standard format for essays and citations created by the Modern Language Association. It is typically used in the humanities, while other formats are more common in other fields of study.
  1. Which of the following date formats is correct MLA style?
    1. 15/3/16
    2. March 15, 2016
    3. 15 March 2016
    4. 15 March, 2016
  2. Use the following Works Cited entry to write an in-text citation–include closing quotation marks, parenthesis, and end punctuation:
Clinton, Bill. Interview by Andrew C. Revkin. “Clinton on Climate
             Change.” New York Times. New York Times, May 2007.
              Web. 25 May 2009.
  1. In MLA format, how should the entries on a Works Cited page be arranged?
Wed. 3/16
  1. Identify the problem with the following Works Cited entry:
“The Secret Life of Bees.” All Content. N.p., n.d. Web.   02 Apr. 2014.
  1. Identify the error(s) in the following in-text citation:
According to one film critic, The Secret Life of Bees is “a parable of hope and love. (Ebert)”
  1. Add an MLA style page number to your notebook page.
Review
Monday 3/7
DIRECTIONS: Run-ons, comma splices, and fused sentences are all names given to compound sentences that are not punctuated correctly. Rewrite the following sentences, and correct the spelling and punctuation as you go.  Note: Watch out for run-ons!
1.Most people prefer to avoid Butte on St. Patricks day its too dangerous
2.The meeting on friday went well we decided to use the same book at CHS and HHS after all
3.Alot of  HHS students take duel credit there senior year
Tuesday 3/8
Combine the following simple sentences into single compound or complex sentences.  Use the correct punctuation, add conjunctions as necessary, and eliminate wordiness / repetition.
  1. Amir is the narrator.  Amir uses irony. Amir’s irony makes the story interesting.
  2. Joe waited for the train.  The train was late.  Joe took the bus.
  3. The dog barked.  The dog was loud.  The dog was big.
Wednesday 3/9
  • Fragment: Phrase or dependent clause not attached to any other clause.
  • Run-On: Two or more independent clauses are joined without punctuation or conjunction.
  • Comma Splice: A type of run on in which a comma is used to join two or more independent clauses.
Identify the following as Fragments (frag), Run-Ons (r/o), Comma Splices (c/s), or correct sentences (ok)
  1. Will loves the outdoors, he goes outside every chance he gets.
  2. He enjoys walking through the country he often goes backpacking on his vacations.
  3. Which is why he plans to visit the Bob Marshall over Spring Break.
  4. I wanted to go with him, but I had too much work to do.
Semicolons 2/22-24
 Monday 2/22:  Independent “Marker” Words
-Connecting word used at the beginning of an independent clause; identifies the clause as independent because it cannot be used for dependent clauses or phrases
-Can always begin a sentence
-When the second independent clause in a sentence has an independent marker word, a semicolon is needed before the independent marker word.
Examples:   also, consequently, furthermore, however, moreover, nevertheless, and therefore.
Add correct punctuation to each of the following sentences featuring Independent Marker Words
  1. Shae wanted to ask Anna for help however she was worried Anna might say no
  2. I’m not interested in what you are selling furthermore I asked your company not to contact me ever again
  3. I hate action movies nevertheless I went because Matt wanted to go
Tuesday 2/23
These sentences are borrowed from Grammar Bytes.  http://www.chompchomp.com/handouts/commas02.pdf  ?Visit their website for answers and further practice!
Choose the option that corrects an error in the bolded portion(s). If no error exists, choose “No change is necessary.”
  1. In the (A)crevices between the bathroom (B)tiles, mold sprouts as opportunistically as  weeds do in the (C)cracks, of the sidewalk.
    A. crevices, between
    B. tiles mold
    C. cracks of
    D. No change is necessary.
  2. Diane couldn’t concentrate on (A)General Hospital, because (B)Santana, her beagle who had been cooped up in the house all       (C) day, wanted to take a long walk around the lake.
    A. General Hospital because
    B. Santana her
    C. day wanted
    D. No change is necessary.
  3. The (A)blue, creamy frosting from the cupcake (B)hung like a stalactite at the tip of poor George’s (C)nose, causing Michelle to giggle uncontrollably.
    A. blue creamy
    B. hung, like
    C. nose causing
    D. No change is necessary.
Wednesday 2/24
From Purdue OWL: Each of the following sentences needs either a comma or a semicolon. Put in the necessary punctuation.
1. Many companies make sugar-free soft drinks, which are flavored by synthetic chemicals the drinks usually contain only one or two calories per serving.
2. Mr. Leyland played the viola professionally for many years and he now conducts a community orchestra.
3. The suspect said that he had never met the victim however, the detective knew that he was lying.
Clause Review and Comma Splices 2/16-17
Monday 2/15: No School
Tuesday 2/16:  Clause review:  Copy the sentences, then underline the Independent Clauses once, and circle the Dependent Clauses.
1.When Jim studied in the  coffee shop for his chemistry quiz, it was very noisy.
2.While I usually like pizza, hers was covered in disgusting anchovies.
3.Whatever else he is, he’s not a musician
.
Hint: Use ellipses (…) to shorten sentences as needed.
Wednesday 2/17: Correcting comma splices
Comma splice: A type of run-on sentence in which two independent clauses are linked using only a comma.
Fixes:
  • Use a semicolon to separate the two independent clauses
  • add a coordinating conjunction (FANBOYS) after the existing comma
  • Replace the comma with a period and create a new sentence
Fix each of the following comma splices:
  1. My family bakes together nearly every night, we then get to enjoy everything we make together.
  2. I didn’t like the movie, it was way too long.
  3. My favorite bands are all really loud, playing loud music is good for stress relief.
(All examples in this activity are from Purdue OWL)
Commas  2/8-2/10
Monday Feb. 8:
COMPOUND Sentence:  Two independent clauses and either a coordinate conjunction (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so) or a semicolon
COMPLEX Sentence: One independent and one dependent clause
Write out the following sentences.  Underline the Independent Clauses and circle the Dependent Clauses.
1. I am going home, and I intend to stay there.
2. I ate breakfast before I went to work.
3. Because doctors are concerned about the rising death rate from asthma, they have called for more research into its causes.
Tuesday Feb. 9:
There are two MAJOR uses of the comma.
#1:  Before a coordinate conjunction (F.A.N.B.O.Y.S.) that separates two Independentclauses.
Examples:
-She was sorry about not getting the job, yet she would not wallow in self-pity.
-The horse cantered across the field and then walked cautiously up to the barn.
DIRECTIONS:  Add all appropriate commas and punctuation to the following sentences.
1. Because her alarm clock was broken she was late for class
2. The old man shouted you kids get off my lawn
3. The Lady of the Lake her arm clad in the purest shimmering samite held aloft Excalibur from the bosom of the water
Wednesday Feb. 10:
Major comma use #2:
Place a comma before a coordinate conjunction (F.A.N.B.O.Y.S.) that separates two Independent clauses.
Do not use a comma before a coordinate conjunction if only a part of an Independent clause follows the conjunction.
Add all required punctuation to the following sentences:
1. I had wanted to go to the dance but I had to stay home
2. The horse cantered across the field and then walked cautiously up to the barn

3. I may work with disadvantaged children as my career or I may go into social work
4. She was sorry about not getting the job yet she would not wallow in self-pity
More Clauses and Phrases 2/1-2/3
Clauses and phrases from http://www.csus.edu/owl (California State University- Sacramento Online Writing Lab)
Monday 2/1
Identify each item as one of the following: Independent Clause (I), Dependent Clause (D), or Phrase (P). Be careful to differentiate your Ps from your Ds!
  1. Dorothy and the Scarecrow danced
  2.   if Toto could talk
  3. witches in dark suits wear ruby slippers
  4. since one size fits all girls from Kansas
  5. L. Frank Baum wrote the story for his daughter
  6. an ineffective president portrayed as a wizard
  7. lions and tigers and bears
Tuesday 2/2
  1. while characters represented different groups in American society
  2. the tin man as industrial workers
  3. Oz is short for ounce and referred to the gold standard
  4. although the city was emerald
  5. a gold bullion highway to prosperity and dreams
  6. was William Jennings Bryan a cowardly lion
  7. whereas small farmers were oppressed by Eastern bankers
Wednesday 2/3
  1. mounting resistance by the Grange
  2. purity and innocence characterize Dorothy
  3. blowing smoke and making noise in the great hall
  4. the great and powerful Oz was neither
  5. but Dorothy and Toto got home safely
  6. because Baum’s allegorical story became an American classic
Clauses and Phrases 1/25-1/27
Monday 1/25
*Clauses are complete ideas; they have both a Subject (noun) and a verb.
*Phrases are incomplete ideas because they are missing a noun and/or a verb.
Identify each of the following as either a Clause ( C ), or a Phrase (P).
1.In the kitchen
2.I walked downtown
3.When I walked to the bedroom
4.Without the necessary equipment
5.Fighting against the enemy
6.The dog groaned at the food
7.Whenever I talk to my parents
Tuesday 1/26
Identify each item as one of the following:
Dependent Clause (D)   -Have a subject and a verb, but cannot stand alone as sentences because the thought is not complete.
Independent Clause (I)  -Have a subject and a verb and can stand alone as simple sentences.
Phrase (P)  -Missing either the subject or the verb
1.While I was standing in the kitchen
2.Without a clue in the world
3.I ran across the field
4.In the barn
5.Whenever I feel depressed
Wednesday 1/27
Identify each item as one of the following:
Dependent Clause (D)  -Have a subject and a verb, but cannot stand alone as sentences because the thought is not complete.
Independent Clause (I)  -Have a subject and a verb and can stand alone as simple sentences.
Phrase (P)  -Missing either the subject or the verb
1.The man with the funny hat
2.She stood in the bleachers
3.The airspeed velocity of an unladen swallow
4.I walked downtown
5.Since I won
——
1/4-6: Epic Hero Review
Monday 1/4/16
What traits do most Epic Heroes share?
Choose any that apply (write the letter only):
a. A quest or mission
b. Noble/Unusual birth
c. Uses a unique, special weapon
d. Punishment that exceeds the crime
e. Dies and is reborn (often metaphorically)
f. Is superhuman
g. National hero
h. Helped and hindered by supernatural forces
i. Very friendly
Tuesday 1/5/16
True or false: Epic Heroes are immortal.  Briefly explain your answer (~1 sentence).
Wednesday 1/6/16
At what point in an Epic does the hero nearly abandon his quest? (See monomyth notes)
7-9 December 2015: Commonly Confused Words 3
Monday 12/7: 
  1. I wanted to get the cake with green icing, but of _____________ my mom wouldn’t buy it.
    A. coarse                         B. course
  2. The movie had great special ___________________.
    A. effects                          B. affects
  3. Cindy _______________ the ball harder than anyone I know.
         A. through            B. thru               C. threw
Tuesday  12/8:
4. I was so sick of school I felt like I couldn’t wait for Spring ________________.
A. brake  B. break
5. I really like cereal ______________ for the kinds with raisins or dried fruit in them.
     A. except  B. accept
  1. Thennis is the _______________ of the school.
    A. principal  B. principle
Wednesday 12/9
7. Helena is the _________________ of Montana.
    A. capitol  B. capital
  1. The iPad is a very useful modern _____.
    A. devise    B. device
  2. Time was running out on the clock and I knew we were going to ___________ the game.
    A. loose    B. lose
30 Nov.- 3 December:  Commonly Confused Words 2
Write the word that correctly completes each sentence—choose the best answer.
Monday 11/30:
Definitely/Defiantly
  1. The teenagers _______________ stated that they would not do their laundry.
  2. You should _____________ do your laundry, though, because dirty laundry gets smelly very quickly.
Tuesday 12/1
Affect/Effect
  1. The way you treat others ____________ how they will treat you in return.
  2. The new paint has a lovely, calming __________.
Wed 12/2
Then/Than
  1. Indiana Jones is more fun ______ James Bond.
  2. If you don’t read the book, ______ you will have a difficult time on the quiz.
 Every day/ Everyday
3. Many people use _______________, ordinary language in essays, when they should use more formal word choice.
4. Claire likes to have tea __________________ but Sunday, when she prefers to have coffee.
16-19 November 2015:  Commonly Confused Words 1
Fill in the blank in the following sentences. Be sure to spell each word correctly:
Monday 11/16: They’re, There, Their
1. They left __________ dog with me while they were on vacation.
2. I can’t believe _________ not coming to my birthday party.
3. The cake isn’t here; it’s over ____________.
 Tuesday 11/17:
Its, It’s
1. ______________ only Tuesday and I’m already sick of this bellwork stuff.
2. The dog couldn’t believe _________ luck when it found the leftover steak in the trashcan.
You’re, Your
1. ______________ going to have to walk; we don’t have the money to get horses.
2. You and ____________ friends should meet us there.
Wednesday 11/18: To, Two, Too
1. At the bakery, I ordered _________  croissants.
2. He was __________ trusting; he let his friends trick him into taking the fall for their crime.
3. I had to go _______ the Emergency Room after breaking my arm.
Bell Ringers for the week of November 9-12 2015 :  Activity from Purdue OWL:
Directions: Choose the correct form of the verb that agrees with the subject.
1-4 Monday 11/9
1. Annie and her brothers (is, are) at school.
2. Either my mother or my father (is, are) coming to the meeting.
3. The dog or the cats (is, are) outside.
4. Either my shoes or your coat (is, are) always on the floor.
5-8 Tuesday 11/10

5. George and Tamara (doesn’t, don’t) want to see that movie.
6. Benito (doesn’t, don’t) know the answer.
7. One of my sisters (is, are) going on a trip to France.
8. The man with all the birds (live, lives) on my street.
9-12 Wednesday 11/11

9. The movie, including all the previews, (take, takes) about two hours to watch.
10. The players, as well as the captain, (want, wants) to win.
11. Either answer (is, are) acceptable.
12. Every one of those books (is, are) fiction.
Bell Ringers for the week of October 26-29 2015
10/26-29: From the Holt McDougal British Literature textbook online.  Complete each of the following sentences by writing an example of the part of speech specified. (Like MadLibs!)
EXAMPLE 1. __My_       Interjection, you certainly take good notes!
1-4 Monday 10/26
1. After the race, the runners verb on the sidelines.
2. The adjective performance of the dancers from Bali fascinated the audience.
3. Will your noun be available to baby-sit on Saturday night?
4. The cheetah, the world’s fastest land animal, can run seventy miles an hour, conjunction the much slower domestic cat can run only thirty miles an hour.
5-7 Tuesday 10/27

5. The directions are unclear about whether we should go preposition the bridge.
6. Jerome adverb completed the assignment and then helped others.
7. Are pronoun eating a healthy diet and getting plenty of rest and exercise?
8-10 Wednesday 10/28
8. interjection ! The debate team just won first prize!
9. My cousin, pronoun is a one-handed typist, uses a typing technique called chording on a special keyboard with only seven keys.
10. conjunction she was determined and talented, in 1973 Laura Blears Ching became the first woman to compete against men in an international surfing contest.
Bell Ringers for the week of October 19-21 2015
taken from English Linx
Prepositions:
A preposition is a word that shows position or direction or introduces a prepositional phrase.
Example prepositions: 
across, in, under, around, beneath
 Directions: Write the preposition from each sentence.
Example A- I went around the edge of the lake.
Answer- around
#1-4 Monday 10/19
1. We walked up the stairs.
2. My mom took a walk around the block.
3. I looked under my bed.
4. My friend jumped over the bushes.
#5-8 Tuesday 10/20
5. The pen fell between our desks.
6. I walked to the store.
7. We walked aboard the ship.
8. She walked toward the teacher.
#9-12 Wednesday 10/21
9. I leaned against the wall.
10. I looked across the room.
11. I looked above my roof.
12. She looked over the hill.
Bell Ringers for the week of Oct. 5 2015-Oct. 7 2015 will be taken from the Holt McDougal British Literature textbook online.
Write prepositional phrases to fit the following sentences in order to provide details that make the sentences more interesting. Circle the prepositions you use.
“In English grammar, a preposition is a word… that shows the relationship between a noun or pronoun and other words in a sentence….
The combination of a preposition and a noun phrase is called a prepositional phrase….
Prepositions commonly convey the following relationships: agency (by); comparison (like, as . . . as); direction (to, toward, through); place (at, by, on); possession (of); purpose (for); source (from, out of); and time (at, before, on).” (grammar.about.com)
EXAMPLE 1. Please listen carefully   for  the doorbell.
#1-2: Monday 10/5/15
1. Marta makes delicious casseroles _____________________.
2. ___________________ he whistled a tune.
#3-4: Tuesday 10/6/15
3. Tourists _____________________________ enjoyed the traditional music.
4. _____________ the performance will begin.
#5: Wednesday 10/7/15
5. Excited _________________ the children eagerly watched ________________.
Activity from online textbook at my.hrw.com
Bell Ringers for the week of 9/28/2015 will be taken from the Holt McDougal British Literature textbook online.
Write the interjection from each of the following sentences.
EXAMPLE 1. Hey, whose backpack is this?
#1-2 Monday 9/28
1. Whew! It certainly is hot today!
2. She scored another goal! Hooray!
#2-3 Tuesday 9/29
3. I love the way this cereal tastes! Yum!
4. Well, do we agree or disagree?
#5 Wednesday 9/30
5. I’ve been training for the marathon, and, oh, the long distances are grueling!
Bell Ringers for the week of 9/21/2015 will be taken from the Holt McDougal British Literature textbook online.
Identify the part of speech of each italicized & underlined word by writing above the word one of the following abbreviations: V for verb, ADV for adverb, or CONJ for conjunction.  **WRITE ONLY THE WORD AND THE ABBREVIATION.**
EXAMPLE 1. Earlier I had seen the principal and explained our problem.
–>  Earlier-ADV   had-V seen-V  and– CONJ 
#1- MON. 9/21
  1. With dagger in hand, Macbeth surreptitiously entered the room where King Duncan lay asleep and murdered him.
#2-3 TUES 9/22
  1. Winona carefully studied her notes again before she took the test on Geoffrey Chaucer.
  2. Sir Gawain, who was one of King Arthur’s bravest knights, boldly stepped forward and fearlessly accepted the challenge.
#4-5 WED 9/23
4. For twenty years Penelope and Telemachus, who were Odysseus’ wife and son, had anxiously waited for Odysseus to return to Ithaca.
5. We can read the original story about the hero Beowulf, or we can just as easily read John Gardner’s version, which is told from the point of view of the monster Grendel.
Bell Ringers for the week of 9/14/2015 will be taken from the Holt McDougal British Literature textbook online.
DIRECTIONS: Identify the adverbs in the following sentences, and draw an arrow from each adverb to the word or words it modifies. **WRITE ONLY THE VERB & ADVERB, not the whole sentence.
EXAMPLE 1. Jamaal generously –>offered to take us in his boat to try our new water skis.
#1-2 Monday 9/14
1. Cheryl and I quickly donned our life jackets and raced to Jamaal’s boat.
2. We really believed we could skim gracefully over the water after a few minutes on our skis.
#3-4 Tuesday 9/15
3. Soon we were roaring toward the ski area; there we dropped Cheryl overboard with the skis and towrope.
4. When Cheryl was ready, Jamaal accelerated gradually, and Cheryl rose smoothly above the surface.
#5 Wednesday 9/16
5. She swung easily to the right but then careened wildly to the left before plunging into the boat’s wake.
Bell Ringers for the week of 9/8/2015 will be taken from the Holt McDougal British Literature textbook online.
Directions: Copy down the following sentences, then underline the nouns once and the adjectives twice.  You do not need to underline a, an, or the.
#1-Tuesday 9/8
My little sister and brother are fascinated by the program Teletubbies, in which four technological babies frolic in an imaginary world.
NO BELL RINGERS Wed. 9/9 (Benchmark Assessment)
#2-Thursday 9/10
The performers in Ipi Ntombi, a South African musical, wear splendid costumes as they perform a lively blend of traditional and modern South African song and dance.

Comments are closed.